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Families and children in Norway

  • From extended family to nuclear family »

    As elsewhere in the world, the family is an important part of people's lives in Norwegian society. However, what constitutes a normal family depends on who you ask and on the context. In the old fa...

  • Family policy »

    The period from the end of the Second World War (1940-1945) until the late 1960s is often called the 'heyday of the housewife'. Mothers stayed at home with their children, while fathers worked outs...

  • Family/cohabitation arrangements »

    Modern family life is characterised by great variation in family and cohabitation arrangements. There is now more freedom of choice and acceptance for people who wish to choose untraditional soluti...

  • Complex family structures »

    The divorce rate in Norway is relatively high. Many people start new relationships after the breakdown of a marriage or relationship, perhaps with a new partner who also already has children. It ha...

  • Cohabitation »

    Cohabitation is very common in Norway. By cohabitation is meant an arrangement whereby two adults live together without having signed a written legal contract that regulates their relationship. In ...

  • Family life and the law »

    Family life involves many legal aspects. By 'family' is normally meant parents who live together with their children, but childless married couples and single parents are also families. We mainly d...

  • Children's rights »

    Regardless of who the parents are and which of them the child lives with, children in Norway have strong legal protection based on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Children's upbringin...